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In honor of Dave Chappelle, the building of his former high school will be named.

Months after criticism from students at a Washington, D.C. high school, Dave Chappelle’s alma mater decided to name a theater after him.

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts has scheduled the Dave Chappelle Theater to open on June 20 with a comedian initiation ceremony. It is reported by TMZ.

Chappelle attended the Duke Ellington School of the Arts to speak in November but was met with fury from many of the students who currently attend due to the jokes he made about transgender people in several Netflix comedy shows, and one 16-year-old the teenager called it “childish”. .’

The heated questions and answers became more contentious between Chappelle and the students, with the comedian remarking, “I’m better than any instrumentalist, artist, no matter what you do in this school, right now I’m better than all of you.” I’m sure this will change. I am sure you will become celebrities soon.

Following the response from the students of the school, Chappelle issued an Instagram challenge to those who oppose the school’s plans to build a building named after him: “If you object to me receiving this award, I encourage you to donate to the school by noting your objection. “If you are in favor of the theater being called the Chapelle, I encourage you to make a donation to the school with your approval.”

Before challenging, Chappelle has been a generous donor to the school for many years, reportedly donating $100,000 and one of his 2017 Emmy Awards.

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts has scheduled the Dave Chappelle Theater to open on June 20 with a comedian initiation ceremony.

The Duke Ellington School of the Arts has scheduled the Dave Chappelle Theater to open on June 20 with a comedian initiation ceremony.

Dave Chappelle performs at his Duke Ellington School of the Arts, where a theater will be named after him.

Dave Chappelle performs at his Duke Ellington School of the Arts, where a theater will be named after him.

Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C., from which Chappelle graduated in 1991.

Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C., from which Chappelle graduated in 1991.

It looks like his opponents weren’t able to raise enough money and now his name is going to appear in the Dave Chappelle Theatre.

Much of the backlash against Chappelle came from comments he made on his special edition of The Closer, including the “gender is a fact” statement and aligning with Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling, who famously stated that transgender women were not real women in 2019.

Daphne Dorman, a trans comedian and girlfriend of Chappelle, died in 2019 and is featured in Chappelle's Netflix special

Daphne Dorman, a trans comedian and girlfriend of Chappelle, died in 2019 and is featured in Chappelle’s Netflix special “The Closer”.

He also jokes about the anatomy of trans women in the Netflix special, saying that they don’t have real female reproductive organs and that they don’t have menstrual blood, but “beetroot juice”.

Chappelle also spoke about his friend and trans woman Daphne Dorman, who took her own life in 2019 at the age of 44 after defending Chappelle because of his earlier jokes.

“When she did that, the trans community pushed that bitch through Twitter,” Chappelle told The Closer.

“This is a true story; my heart was broken,” he continued. “I don’t know what’s going on, but I bet dragging her didn’t help.”

His jokes have drawn a furious reaction from an Ohio comedian who says his documentary has been pulled from film festivals and abandoned by film distributors.

Organizations such as the National Coalition for Black Justice and GLAAD condemned the jokes told in Chappelle’s special.

Chappelle's Closer special premiered on Netflix on October 5, 2021.

Chappelle’s “Closer” special, his latest comedy number for Netflix, has sparked controversy around his remarks about transgender people and the LGBT community.

Chappelle’s jokes about the transgender community were echoed by Netflix, with Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos defending the comedian in an internal email, saying, “We don’t allow headlines on Netflix that are meant to incite hate or violence, and we don’t believe crosses that line.”

Chappelle thanked the co-CEO on a later comedy show, telling the audience, “Thank God for Netflix’s Ted Sarandos, he’s the only one who hasn’t canceled me yet.”

Netflix has faced backlash for the defense, including layoffs and an organized employee strike last October.

Dave Chappelle and Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos speak backstage at the 36th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at the Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse on October 30, 2021 in Cleveland, Ohio.

Dave Chappelle and Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos speak backstage at the 36th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony at the Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse on October 30, 2021 in Cleveland, Ohio.

But Sarandos later retracted his original stance, saying, “I screwed up the internal connection – and I don’t mean just mechanically.”

Sarandos continued: “I feel like I should have made it a point to acknowledge that our group of employees were very badly affected by the decision that was made, and I should have acknowledged in advance before going into rationalizing anything they went through. I say this because I deeply respect them and appreciate their contributions to Netflix. They were in pain and I had to admit it first.

Many transgender activists saw Chappelle’s comedy as an example of “hitting a community with little power”. In a video posted to his Instagram after the special, Chappelle said he would meet the transgender community but would not “yield to anyone’s demands”.

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